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Around this time, Bernarr Macfadden, an American exponent of physical culture, popularised the use of fasting to restore health. His disciple, the osteopathic physician Dr. Hugh William Conklin of Battle Creek, Michigan, began to treat his epilepsy patients by recommending fasting. Conklin conjectured that epileptic seizures were caused when a toxin, secreted from the Peyer's patches in the intestines, was discharged into the bloodstream. He recommended a fast lasting 18 to 25 days to allow this toxin to dissipate. Conklin probably treated hundreds of epilepsy patients with his "water diet" and boasted of a 90% cure rate in children, falling to 50% in adults. Later analysis of Conklin's case records showed 20% of his patients achieved freedom from seizures and 50% had some improvement.[10]
Besides the well-known medical problems individuals can develop as a result of weight gain (high blood pressure, diabetes, cancer, stroke, and heart disease), extra weight puts additional stress on joints and bones. For example, the corticosteroid prednisone causes weight gain to some degree in nearly all patients who take the medication and can lead to redistribution of body fat to places like the face, back of the neck, and abdomen.
Even if you've been eating right on track, it may be tough to stay on track if your partner, coworkers, or friends don't share your healthy-eating habits. What to do? If your partner loves pizza, try ordering a pie that's heavy on the veggies and light on the cheese—then supplement it with a side salad. Or, if your friends are having a girls' night out, suggest a restaurant that's got healthy appetizer options, instead of the typical fare of onion rings and cheese dip. And at work, instead of Friday baked-goods day, suggest a Friday "make it healthy" day, and swap in baked pears with cinnamon or mini fruit-and-nut muffins for brownies and blondies.
One morning, by way of The Dr. Oz Show, I discovered Shaun T, fitness trainer and creator of INSANITY workout (of infomercial fame). His program intrigued me, but what really kept my attention was the way he harped on nutrition. Most exercise programs promise extreme results just by going through the motions. But he was adamant that great results can only be achieved by also overhauling your eating habits. Since exercising like a maniac had scarcely made a dent in my dimples, I decided to give his way a shot. Sayonara, fried and processed food. I was in for a nutritional overhaul.
When trying to slim and trim, you may be tempted to take drastic measures like cutting out your carbs. But before you go and add dinner rolls and chips to your "no" list, remember that yummy foods like brown rice, pumpernickel bread, and even potato chips contain Resistant Starch, a metabolism-boosting carb that keeps you full for longer. And that's great for maintaining a fit you because you won't have to eat as much to feel satiated. So go on, rip open that (single-serve) bag of Lay's!
We can probably thank Instagram for making activated charcoal so popular since all the foods containing this ingredient are an eye-popping shade of black. From black ice cream to black smoothies to black granola to activated charcoal cocktails, this ingredient made the “it” list this year. Activated charcoal is believed to be a detoxifying agent and this has some merit: It’s often used to treat poisoning and certain drug overdoses. But at the same time, it also binds to certain vitamins and minerals, as well as some common prescription medications (like certain antidepressants). And it might cause constipation, which is probably not the detox advantage you’re looking for. It’s not a big deal to eat some Insta-worthy black food from time to time, but I wouldn’t make a wellness strategy out of activated charcoal.

A particular diet may be chosen to seek weight loss or weight gain. Changing a subject's dietary intake, or "going on a diet", can change the energy balance and increase or decrease the amount of fat stored by the body. Some foods are specifically recommended, or even altered, for conformity to the requirements of a particular diet. These diets are often recommended in conjunction with exercise. Specific weight loss programs can be harmful to health, while others may be beneficial and can thus be coined as healthy diets. The terms "healthy diet" and "diet for weight management" are often related, as the two promote healthy weight management. Having a healthy diet is a way to prevent health problems, and will provide the body with the right balance of vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients.[4]
The fat-soluble vitamins are A, D, E, and K. Adequate absorption of these vitamins is dependent on efficient fat intake and absorption. Except for vitamin K, fat-soluble vitamins are not easily excreted from the body, so they can be toxic at excessive levels. The only way to reach toxic levels would be through taking supplements, not through your diet. This is another case when balance is the key, and excessive amounts can cause harm.
As for the mantra? Turoff thinks they are good words to live by, saying, “I kind of like it — it’s a pretty good description of balance, and people should include fun foods in their diet.” Also, Turoff adds, it’s a much better line than what model Kate Moss once said: “Nothing tastes as good as skinny feels.” (Though Elle has since reported that the veteran model now regrets saying that.)
Carbohydrates are the primary source of fuel for your body. Your red blood cells and most parts of your brain derive all of their energy from carbohydrates. An adequate consumption of carbohydrates also allows your body to use protein and fat for their necessary requirements, it prevents ketosis, it provides fiber, and it's the source of sweetness in your foods.
Fiber aids digestion, prevents constipation, and lowers cholesterol -- and can help with weight loss. Most Americans get only half the fiber they need. To reap fiber's benefits, most women should get about 25 grams daily, while men need about 38 grams -- or 14 grams per 1,000 calories. Good fiber sources include oatmeal, beans, whole grain foods, nuts, and most fruits and vegetables.
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