Here’s what we do know: The keto diet may be useful in treating symptoms of epilepsy, a seizure disorder. “The use of keto in treating epilepsy has the most evidence,” Angelone says. One study conducted by Johns Hopkins Medicine, for example, followed epileptic patients on the keto diet and found that 36 percent of them had a 50 percent reduction in seizures after three months on the diet, and 16 percent were seizure-free. However, experts aren't entirely sure why the keto diet has this affect, she adds.
You know it: a sharp pain just below the rib cage that always seems to pop up when you're working out your hardest. It's called the side stitch, and it can be a major nuisance—especially when it keeps you from completing a workout. To ease the ache (so you can get on with your run), take your fist and press it beneath your rib cage while taking deep breaths from your belly for about 10 steps. In about 30 seconds, the pain should subside, so you can get on back to (fitness) work.
There’s no one-size-fits-all plan for nutrition. “You must design a diet you can live with for life, not a quick-fix gimmick that always results in weight regain,” says Somer. “Respect and love yourself to feed your body only foods that will fuel and nurture it, not foods that undermine health.” So, ask around, do some research and find a healthy, doctor-backed plan that appeals to you. Will it be hard? In the beginning, yes. Any major lifestyle change usually is. Is it worth it? Do the work and button-up your old skinny jeans. Then you’ll have your answer.
Now is the time to forget the 1980s strategy of low-fat/reduced-fat/fat-free. When you're assembling your keto diet food stash, go full-fat. And don't stress over the dietary cholesterol content, a factor of how much animal protein you eat, suggests a study published in The Journal of Nutrition. For the healthiest blood cholesterol levels, instead focus on consuming a higher ratio of unsaturated fats (flaxseed, olive oil, nuts) to saturated fats (lard, red meat, palm oil, butter).
A love/hate relationship with weight loss emerged in 2018. The most recent Centers for Disease Control survey found that almost 50 percent of Americans tried to lose weight in the past year—a time when anti-diet sentiment was just as strong. As you can see from popular search terms, we’re clearly not ready to ditch dieting just yet, and that’s okay. Though the word “diet” puts some people off, reaching a healthier weight to feel better, manage your health with fewer medications, or to experience more energy, better sleep, and more confidence are worthwhile goals to pursue. Clearly, I discourage restrictive eating, but if you want to follow a plan that’s more inclusive than exclusive, includes generous servings of veggies, and helps you develop a framework for establishing sustainable, healthier eating habits that also encourages weight loss, I’m not going to knock it.
The strategy worked for people whether they followed diets that were mostly low in fat or mostly low in carbohydrates. And their success did not appear to be influenced by their genetics or their insulin-response to carbohydrates, a finding that casts doubt on the increasingly popular idea that different diets should be recommended to people based on their DNA makeup or on their tolerance for carbs or fat.
Carbohydrates are the primary source of fuel for your body. Your red blood cells and most parts of your brain derive all of their energy from carbohydrates. An adequate consumption of carbohydrates also allows your body to use protein and fat for their necessary requirements, it prevents ketosis, it provides fiber, and it's the source of sweetness in your foods.

Keto breath, on the other hand, is less of a side-effect and more of a harmless inconvenience (your breath literally smells like nail polish remover). Basically, when your body breaks down all that extra fat on the keto diet, it produces ketones—one of which is the chemical acetone, Keatley previously told WomensHealthMag.com. (Yes, the same stuff that's in nail polish remover.)


Differences in diet and lifestyle may account for the variability of prostate cancer rates in different countries. Good nutrition may help reduce the risk of developing prostate cancer, slow progression of the disease and prevent aggressive disease. In this section, we discuss guidelines for a healthy diet for good prostate health and guidelines for a healthy diet while in treatment for prostate cancer. These tips, however, should never be used as a replacement for treatment.
Sodium: This is critical for nerve impulse transmission and helps to maintain cells' normal fluid balance. The guidelines for sodium consumption are to consume less than 2,300 mg (approximately 1 tsp of salt) of sodium per day and to choose and prepare foods with little salt. At the same time, consume potassium-rich foods, such as fruits and vegetables.
On Phase One: Induction, you’ll eat scrumptious proteins like fish, poultry, meats , eggs, and cheese, as well as wonderfully satisfying, buttery vegetables and healthy fats like avocado. Later on, you’ll be able to add virtually all food groups, from the acceptable food lists including full-fat yogurt, nuts, seeds, fruits, starchy vegetables like sweet potato, and even whole grains.
The emergence of low-carbohydrate diets has resulted in confusion over whether carbohydrates are good or bad. Carbohydrates are one of the six essential nutrients. This means that they are essential for your health, so there is no way that omitting them from your diet would be beneficial. An excess intake of any nutrient will cause weight gain. The key is to consume the appropriate sources and amounts of carbohydrates.
The most important thing to read on the food label is the very first line. The serving size that is listed is what all of the rest of the information is based upon. For example, if you were looking at a label for cookies and the serving size was two cookies, all of the nutrition information on the label would be based on the consumption of two cookies. When you consume more than two cookies, you need to increase the numbers based on how many servings you consume. For example, if there are 100 calories in two cookies, and you consume six cookies, you would be consuming 300 calories.
In recent years, many specialized diets have gained popularity among some people with arthritis. To date, few of these claims have been substantiated by rigorously controlled studies. That said, some people find that certain foods trigger changes in symptoms –– either for the better or the worse. If you find yourself noticing this type of pattern, try keeping a food diary for a few weeks to test if indeed what you eat makes a difference or if you have food sensitivities.
Achieving ketosis is a pretty straightforward, but it can seem complicated and confusing with all of the information out there.4If you want to learn more about ketosis and the scientific process around it, you can visit a very in-depth discussion about on Dr. Peter Attia’s website. Here’s the bottom line on what you need to do, ordered in levels of importance:
I want to conclude with a very important point. The goal isn't to go for "perfection" with your diet. The goal is to make some changes to what you are currently doing and continue to add and remove things as you go. There are not "good" and "bad" foods. Each food can fit into your diet, but the frequency and quantity may need to be altered. Think of foods as "everyday" foods and "sometimes" foods, and go for lots of color and a balance of foods from each of the food groups. Remember, eating is a social, enjoyable activity that can be both fun and healthy. Bon appétit.
Vitamins fall into two classes: fat-soluble and water-soluble. Their solubility will determine how the vitamin is absorbed and transported by the bloodstream, whether or not it can be stored in the body, and how easily it can be lost from the body. Requirements for each of the vitamins are based on age, gender, pregnancy, and lactation. You can find them at http://www.iom.edu/Object.File/Master/7/296/
Watching your weight may also reduce your risk of dying from prostate cancer. Recent studies have indicated that the risk of dying from prostate cancer is more than double in obese men diagnosed with the disease compared with men of normal weight at the time of diagnosis. Obese men with local or regional disease have been shown to have nearly four times the risk of their cancer spreading beyond the prostate or metastasizing.
There's no denying it: Getting the fresh air from exercising outdoors is great! But along with it, you also get the harmful UV rays. To keep yourself shielded while still having fun in the sun, opt for a sweat-proof screen with SPF 30 or higher (look out for types that say "water-resistant" or "waterproof" on the bottle, terms regulated by the FDA), a lip balm with SPF 15 or higher, a lightweight hat, and sports shades. Also consider trading in your white tee and instead going for a shirt with built-in UV protection (a rating of 30 UVP is necessary to be awarded the Skin Cancer Foundation's "Seal of Recommendation"; a white T-shirt has a rating of 10). And remember, the rays are at their brightest from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., so try to plan a before-or post-work sweat-session.
The award for the most bizarre trend in 2018 goes to this plan, which eliminates some of the healthiest foods, including fruits and veggies, nuts and seeds, beans, and grains (including whole grains). What’s left? Beef, chicken, fish, eggs, turkey, butter, milk, yogurt, and cheese. I’m typically open to any eating style that’s practiced in a healthy way, but since this plan is virtually devoid of beneficial nutrients, such as antioxidants, phytochemicals, and fiber, from plants, I can’t give it any props. And in fact, even if you’re losing weight eating nothing but animal foods, there’s still a good chance this plan will do some long-term damage. One study found that within two days of shifting to a mostly meat-and-cheese diet, your microbiome shifts in a way that promotes inflammation and intestinal disease. Plant foods are key to optimal health, as we know from studying people who live the longest, good quality lives, so let’s hope this diet trend gets dropped come the new year.
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“I really believe that the more informed you are about the benefits of a healthy bite versus the chain reaction that you’re going to put into effect in your body when you take that bite — you just suddenly don’t want to make that choice for yourself anymore. It’s beyond willpower at that point; it’s become a desire to do something good for yourself.” — Christie Brinkley
Focus on exercise: In a 2008 study in Obstetrics & Gynecology, almost 30 percent of women reported that they had experienced low libido in the past year. “Exercise is one of the best ways to improve body image, which affects libido,” says Heather Hausenblas, an associate professor of health sciences at Jacksonville University, in Florida, whose research focuses on exercise and body image. Libido is also affected by mood and self-esteem, and exercise can improve both.
Focus on exercise: The most compelling studies favor physical activity for mental acuity, says Gary W. Small, M.D., the director of the UCLA Longevity Center and a coauthor of The Alzheimer’s Prevention Program ($14, amazon.com). A study from the Annals of Internal Medicine found that people who were fitter at midlife had a 36 percent lower risk of developing dementia later in life than did their less-fit peers. “When people exercise, the areas that control memory, thinking, and attention increase in the brain,” says Small. “Regular exercisers also have less of the abnormal protein deposits in the brain that have been linked to Alzheimer’s.” That’s not to say that diet has no impact, says Small: “It’s just that the effects of exercise are more pronounced based on the evidence we have now.” Foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids (such as fish, nuts, and flaxseed) and antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables (like strawberries and spinach) have been shown to improve brain health, while refined sugars and processed foods can have the opposite effect.
When your body burns its stores of fat, it can be hard on your kidneys. And starting a ketogenic diet -- or going back to a normal diet afterward -- can be tricky if you’re obese because of other health issues you’re likely to have, like diabetes, a heart condition, or high blood pressure. If you have any of these conditions, make diet changes slowly and only with the guidance of your doctor.

The ketogenic diet has recently become very popular, and many food companies want to cash in by putting a “ketogenic” or “low carb” label on a new product. Be very cautious of special “keto” or “low-carb” products, such as pastas, chocolate bars, energy bars, protein powders, snack foods, cakes, cookies and other “low carb” or “ketogenic” treats. Read all labels carefully for natural low carb ingredients. The fewer ingredients the better.


Whether or not you need specialty bars and other packaged goods formulated with probiotics is another matter. “Science has not shown that probiotics improve general health,” says Dr. Shira Doron, infectious diseases physician and associate hospital epidemiologist at Tufts Medical Center. “Certain diseases and conditions have been studied, with varying results, some of which suggest that probiotics can mitigate symptoms. If you’re taking a probiotic for a specific condition, it is critically important that you use the same strain, formulation and dose that were shown to be effective in clinical trials; otherwise you cannot assume you will experience the same positive effect,” she explains.
The end is here! Three cheers for all your hard work. But that doesn't mean it's time to put on the brakes. To maintain your weight, you still have to make those smart choices at restaurants, work, and home. Look into getting a diet confidante, who you can chat with once a week about your eating highs and oh-no's. And stick to using that scale so you can be proactive if a few extra pounds creep back on. Don't let your exercise routine change, either, because even if you don't have any more pounds to lose, you'll still be working out your ticker. And we heart that!

When you crunch the numbers, it makes sense. The thing is, exercise makes you hungry, and it’s surprisingly easy to overcompensate with extra calories. People tend to overestimate how many calories they’ve burned during exercise—often by more than twice as much, and then feel like they deserve a treat. From a simple math perspective, 30 minutes of jogging can burn about 295 calories, cycling burns around 295 calories, and gentle yoga can torch about 90 calories. With one cheeseburger, donut, or beer, you’re making up the difference, and then some.  
People receiving cancer treatment need to be aware of food safety, because some treatments may weaken the immune system and lead to an infection. An infection occurs when harmful bacteria, viruses, or fungi, such as yeast, invade the body and the immune system is not able to destroy them quickly enough. Here are some basic food safety tips to reduce the risk of infection.
On the ketogenic diet, carbohydrates are restricted and so cannot provide for all the metabolic needs of the body. Instead, fatty acids are used as the major source of fuel. These are used through fatty-acid oxidation in the cell's mitochondria (the energy-producing parts of the cell). Humans can convert some amino acids into glucose by a process called gluconeogenesis, but cannot do this by using fatty acids.[57] Since amino acids are needed to make proteins, which are essential for growth and repair of body tissues, these cannot be used only to produce glucose. This could pose a problem for the brain, since it is normally fuelled solely by glucose, and most fatty acids do not cross the blood–brain barrier. However, the liver can use long-chain fatty acids to synthesise the three ketone bodies β-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate and acetone. These ketone bodies enter the brain and partially substitute for blood glucose as a source of energy.[56]
On the ketogenic diet, carbohydrates are restricted and so cannot provide for all the metabolic needs of the body. Instead, fatty acids are used as the major source of fuel. These are used through fatty-acid oxidation in the cell's mitochondria (the energy-producing parts of the cell). Humans can convert some amino acids into glucose by a process called gluconeogenesis, but cannot do this by using fatty acids.[57] Since amino acids are needed to make proteins, which are essential for growth and repair of body tissues, these cannot be used only to produce glucose. This could pose a problem for the brain, since it is normally fuelled solely by glucose, and most fatty acids do not cross the blood–brain barrier. However, the liver can use long-chain fatty acids to synthesise the three ketone bodies β-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate and acetone. These ketone bodies enter the brain and partially substitute for blood glucose as a source of energy.[56]

In many developing countries, the ketogenic diet is expensive because dairy fats and meat are more expensive than grain, fruit and vegetables. The modified Atkins diet has been proposed as a lower-cost alternative for those countries; the slightly more expensive food bill can be offset by a reduction in pharmaceutical costs if the diet is successful. The modified Atkins diet is less complex to explain and prepare and requires less support from a dietitian.[55]
Aim to fill half your plate with fruits and veggies at every meal, recommends the United States Department of Agriculture. Try to “eat the rainbow” by choosing fruits and veggies of different colors. This will help you enjoy the full range of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants that the produce aisle has to offer. Every time you go to the grocery store, considering choosing a new fruit or vegetable to try. For snacks, keep dried fruits in your workout bag and raw veggies in the fridge.
Make sure that the diet has been studied extensively for safety — and discuss any changes with your physician or registered dietitian before beginning a new diet. (If you don’t have a dietitian, find one in your area at the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics website.) And do a self-check to ensure the diet fits with your own values and preferences.
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