The award for the most bizarre trend in 2018 goes to this plan, which eliminates some of the healthiest foods, including fruits and veggies, nuts and seeds, beans, and grains (including whole grains). What’s left? Beef, chicken, fish, eggs, turkey, butter, milk, yogurt, and cheese. I’m typically open to any eating style that’s practiced in a healthy way, but since this plan is virtually devoid of beneficial nutrients, such as antioxidants, phytochemicals, and fiber, from plants, I can’t give it any props. And in fact, even if you’re losing weight eating nothing but animal foods, there’s still a good chance this plan will do some long-term damage. One study found that within two days of shifting to a mostly meat-and-cheese diet, your microbiome shifts in a way that promotes inflammation and intestinal disease. Plant foods are key to optimal health, as we know from studying people who live the longest, good quality lives, so let’s hope this diet trend gets dropped come the new year.
Many diet plans cut out entire food groups, which can create nutrient deficiencies as well as health problems. For instance, if the diet is very low in carbohydrates and you have type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes, it’s probably not a good fit. And if it’s too restrictive and you’re pregnant or breastfeeding, it’s not a good idea, either. Keep in mind that pregnancy is not a time for weight loss. Speak with your doctor before making any changes to your diet if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.
The 160 people in the study, who were all over 55, began the study showing thinking skills that were similar to people in their 90s: 28 years older, on average, than they actually were. The volunteers were divided into four groups. One group participated in an aerobic exercise program, another was assigned a low-sodium diet, a third was asked to exercise and change their diet at the same time, and a fourth control group was provided educational sessions about how to improve their brain health.
Variations on the Johns Hopkins protocol are common. The initiation can be performed using outpatient clinics rather than requiring a stay in hospital. Often, no initial fast is used (fasting increases the risk of acidosis, hypoglycaemia, and weight loss). Rather than increasing meal sizes over the three-day initiation, some institutions maintain meal size, but alter the ketogenic ratio from 2:1 to 4:1.[9]
Having ready-to-eat snacks and meals-in-minutes on hand sets you up for success. You'll be less likely to hit the drive-through or order a pizza if you can throw together a healthy meal in five or 10 minutes. Here are some essentials to keep on hand: frozen vegetables, whole-grain pasta, reduced-fat cheese, canned tomatoes, canned beans, pre-cooked grilled chicken breast, whole grain tortillas or pitas, and bags of salad greens.
×