If you’re like many resolution setters this time of year, you’ve already mapped out a route to your local gym. Maybe you’re planning to pound the treadmills or sweat it out in crowded studio classes. But if your ultimate goal is to drop extra pounds, you might want to ask how far all those miles and squats will really get you. According to a number of weight loss experts, focusing on your nutrition could give you a lot more bang for your buck. “By far, diet outweighs exercise if you want to lose weight,” says Heather Mangieri, RDN and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “You have to change your diet to change body composition. You can never out-exercise a bad diet.” So don’t sweat it—at least not quite so much. Here’s where to start with a weight loss resolution.
When you eat foods high in carbohydrates and fat, your body naturally produces glucose. Carbohydrates are the easiest thing for the body to process, and therefore it will use them first – resulting in the excess fats to be stored immediately. In turn, this causes weight gain and health problems that are associated with high fat, high carbohydrate diets (NOT keto).
In addition to all the effort she pours into her career, she’s had to put in a lot work managing Hashimoto’s disease, which she announced she had been diagnosed with in 2016. Hashimoto’s is an autoimmune disorder in which your immune system starts attacking your thyroid, according to the National Institutes of Health. That, in turn, means your thyroid can’t make the proper amount of hormones, which may lead to symptoms like tiredness, joint and muscle pain, and weight gain. (Hashimoto’s is a cause of hypothyroidism.)
Because some cancer cells are inefficient in processing ketone bodies for energy, the ketogenic diet has also been suggested as a treatment for cancer.[59][60] A 2018 review looked at the evidence from preclinical and clinical studies of ketogenic diets in cancer therapy. The clinical studies in humans are typically very small, with some providing weak evidence for anti-tumour effect, particularly for glioblastoma, but in other cancers and studies, no anti-tumour effect was seen. Taken together, results from preclinical studies, albeit sometimes contradictory, tend to support an anti-tumor effect rather than a pro-tumor effect of the KD for most solid cancers.[61]
Many diets, including Atkins and the keto diet, fit into this umbrella. A typical low-carb diet limits carbs to less than 60 g daily, but this can vary, according to the Mayo Clinic. (15) In a September 2015 review published in PLoS One, people following low-carb diets saw modest weight loss — although study authors note that long-term effects of the diet require further research. (16)
If you're losing weight but not as fast as you'd like, don't get discouraged. Dropping pounds takes time, just like gaining them did. Experts suggest setting a realistic weight loss goal of about one to two pounds a week. If you set your expectations too high, you may give up when you don’t lose weight fast enough. Remember, you start seeing health benefits when you've lost just 5%-10% of your body weight.
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